– Classification of publications – All

18 Oct Review of Ireland’s Energy Policy in the Context of the Changing Economy

Irish Academy of Engineering (IAE)
2009
This Report follows on from the Report on Future Energy Policy in Ireland published by the Irish Academy of Engineering in March 2006. The selected topics contained in the Report relate to areas of more immediate priority in the context of the changing economy. The Academy published a series of follow‐up, supplementary reports on energy matters over the next two years. This Report is based on the consensus view of the Irish Academy of Engineering’s Steering Committee on Energy (see inside back cover for details of the Committee). They were assisted in addressing this highly complex subject by a number of other parties, whose contribution is acknowledged on the inside back cover. The Report does not necessarily reflect the personal views of all the Academy members.
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18 Oct Irish Energy Policy – Update on Electricity Price Competitiveness

Irish Academy of Engineering (IAE)
2009
In June 2009 the Irish Academy of Engineering published a review of Ireland’s energy policy. This review was carried out in the context of the major changes taking place in Ireland’s economy and focussed especially on energy price competitiveness. In particular the review drew attention to the growing lack of competitiveness of Irish electricity prices when compared to EU averages and strongly suggested a re‐examination of government policies in light of the urgent need to restore the country’s international competitiveness. The Academy  updated its analysis based on Eurostat statistics for 2009.
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18 Oct Directive: quotas for the period 2013-2020 of the European Community

National Academy of Technologies of France (NATF)
2011
The NATF supports the EU efforts to inverse the present climate trends and to prepare EU countries for the future world that will be inevitably much less- or even carbon-free. It recommends, however, proceeding cautiously in order not to displace the emissions out of the Union and to unwillingly contribute to their global, world increase. This short memo analyses the impact of proposed EU measures on European competitivity and produces recommendations on how to reinforce economic activities in the countries of the Union. (85 words)
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18 Oct Renewable energies – Challenges along the way towards total supply

Swiss Academy of Engineering Sciences (SATW)
2011
Theoretically, renewable energies in Switzerland have sufficient potential to cover national demand. As yet, however, they play only a subordinate role. There is a need for research and development to lower costs. Wind and solar energy have the disadvantage that they are not continuously available. This situation needs to be remedied through technical conversion and storage processes such as pumped-storage power plants or new types of battery. The development and above all expansion of the use of renewable energies are not just technical and economic matters but also require the cooperation of society. Without the active involvement of the population the way towards total supply becomes inaccessible, since it is the people as voters, consumers and investors who directly determine the energy future. To assist them in their decision-making they should have access to reliable and comprehensible information highlighting the possibilities of renewable energies but also the challenges that they present.
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18 Oct Energy Policy and Economic Recovery; 2010 – 2015

Irish Academy of Engineering (IAE)
2011
The unprecedented economic crisis in Ireland has created circumstances that require a rapid and fundamental change in energy policy in order to support economic recovery.  A short term (five year) policy perspective is urgently required.  For the next five years the overriding priority in the energy sector is to achieve a significant cost reduction in order to facilitate competitiveness in the productive, particularly the export, sectors of the economy. The report sets out an alternative strategy for the next five years, based on: - Reducing capital investment in the energy sector to a minimum necessary level, particularly with respect to wind power generation and associated grid extensions. - Switching investment to demand side measures, particularly to energy conservation measures. - Taking advantage of the subdued level of natural gas prices predicted for the next five to ten years. A switch, from a policy focussed on increased electricity production, to one focussed on reducing energy consumption would:- - Meet Ireland’s carbon abatement obligations at a lower cost than current production focussed policy - Provide a significant and welcome stimulus to the Irish construction industry
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18 Oct From Water Technology to Green Growth

Danish Academy of Technical Sciences (ATV)
2011
What is needed in education, research and technological development to enhance the business potential for Danish companies within the water sector? ATV recommends a more intelligent and long-term management of water challenges. This can contribute to growth, sustainability and working places.
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18 Oct Carbon credits

National Academy of Technologies of France (NATF)
2009
This short opinion of the “Energy and Climate Change” Commission of the NATF emits 3 recommendations; 1. 80% of carbon credits exchanges take place in Europe and 20% in the Kyoto market, via the CDP (Clean Development Mechanism). It should be more widely extended. 2. The complexity and the heavy process of carbon credits attribution should be simplified and a special attention should be paid not to only consider important industries. 3. Given its relatively short lifetime, methane is not as accumulated in the atmosphere as is CO2. The GIEC stressing the importance of methane vs. CO2 (1CH4=25CO2) may detour the fight against the CO2 emissions and disperse our efforts.
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18 Oct Critical Infrastructure – Adaptation for Climate Change

Irish Academy of Engineering (IAE)
2009
This report addresses adaptation issues in three key infrastructural areas: water supply, flood alleviation, and energy infrastructure. It is based on inputs from leading specialists in these fields and the deliberations of a symposium, held in Dublin Castle on April 28th, 2009, and attended by the Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government and an invited audience of researchers, engineers, scientists, policy experts and administrators from all parts of Ireland. The IAE make 18 key recommendations in this report. Significantly, most of these do not involve immediate capital expenditure, but deal with institutional steps that are necessary to ensure the problem is tackled effectively and economically
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17 Oct Biofuels – Opportunities and limits

Swiss Academy of Engineering Sciences (SATW)
2009
There is some dispute as to whether and to what extent biofuels should be encouraged: Many open questions remain as to their energy efficiency, commercial viability, as well as environmental and social compatibility. In principle, the SATW supports the encouragement of biofuels, as long as their production and trade result in a positive net energy balance; biofuels must further significantly improve the greenhouse gas balance and meet economic, social and environmental sustainability criteria. The SATW recommends limiting production in Switzerland to biofuels made from biological waste as well as plants unsuitable for human or animal consumption. Before Switzerland begins researching, developing, producing, importing and using biofuels more intensely, rules must be defined to minimise conflicts between food production, environmental protection and energy generation. The Swiss Federal Council is called upon to work towards an international agreement and join it, ensuring that the same principles apply in all countries.
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