– Classification of publications – All

22 Oct Nondestructive evaluation in medical prosthetics

Romanian Academy of Technical Sciences (ASTR)
2013
This paper proposes two types of approaches, the case of heart valves Bjork Shiley convexo-concave (BSCC) nondestructive evaluation by electromagnetic procedures and after that, using Markov model with hidden chains, the lifetime prediction is effectuated and the case of nondestructive evaluation of ceramic hip prosthesis using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy.
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22 Oct Engineering for health

Royal Academy of Engineering (UK) (RAEng)
2012
This paper looks at key areas of medical science and technology, specific issues within healthcare and medicine and uses examples to show the contribution of engineering in each area.
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22 Oct The Innovative Power of Health Technologies Recommendations for the sustainable promotion of innovation in medical technology

National Academy of Science and Engineering (acatech)
2014
Health technology and modern medical technology play a key role in healthcare provision in Germany. They provide systems that help patients make a quicker and more complete recovery, help doctors prescribe more targeted treatments with fewer side-effects and allow people with disabilities to lead independent lives. Medical technology encompasses imaging techniques such as X-ray technology, diagnostic measurement techniques such as electrocardiography and both active and passive implants such as cardiac pacemakers and artificial joints. In recent years, computer-assisted surgery and hospital information systems have also increasingly come to the fore. New and improved medical products are thus not only of benefit to patients but also to doctors working in a wide range of different fields and indeed to business and society as a whole.
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22 Oct Photons and neurons: otherº doors of perception

Real Academia de Ingenieria (Spain) (RAI)
2014
Fotones y neuronas: otras puertas de la percepción. The way our neurons recognize images and, more specifically, optical illusions and how photonics could help us to understand them.
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22 Oct Response to the Consultation Paper for Successor to Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation

Irish Academy of Engineering (IAE)
2015
Detailed response to structured questionnaire, under 8 headings, from the Government’s interdepartmental committee charged with drawing up a new national strategy. A more business orientated approach recommended.
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22 Oct Healthcare for Asylum Seekers

National Academy of Science and Engineering (acatech)
2015
The foremost priority of the German healthcare system is to protect the health of every person living in the country, which includes those seeking humanitarian protection in Germany (asylum seekers). Providing asylum seekers with healthcare is presenting new challenges for the German healthcare system. The academies have identified the following key areas for action: (I) providing medical examinations and care in the initial reception centres, (II) careand treatment of people suffering from mental illnesses and trauma, (III) meeting the demand for qualified personnel, (IV) taking linguistic and cultural needs into consideration, (V) expanding the scope of available data and research. The academies recommend that specialized polyclinics provide medical care in the initial reception centres. The tasks of these clinics should include: ensuring medical expertise that is sensitive to cultural and religious needs; providing (specialist) interpreters; actively engaging with the structuring and organisation of reception centres; networking with hospitals, on-site doctors, and social welfare organisations.
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22 Oct Public Health in Germany – Structures, Developments and Global Challenges

National Academy of Science and Engineering (acatech)
2015
Public health is an important integrative science, translating basic research into better health of populations. Present academic structures for public health research and teaching in Germany are fragmented and, despite continuing efforts and progress, do not always meet national needs and international standards in either scope or scale. Although there are excellent individuals and institutions working in public and global health in Germany, as can be concluded from publication and citation analysis and other indicators, they need increased political support, improved structures and significant research investment.
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22 Oct The patient, technologies and ambulatory medicine

National Academy of Technologies of France (NATF)
2008
Due to the increased life expectancy and the related increase of chronic diseases (as opposed to acute disorders when patients are younger), an alternative approach to hospital care has become necessary: a third of the population of France and the US now suffers from chronic diseases.  Ambulatory medicine, which is a health care system that keeps the patient at home while offering him the same outstanding quality care that he would receive at the hospital, is such an economically viable approach, responding at the same time to the wishes of patients, to economic requirements and scientific, technological and medical developments. This report describes recent advances of ambulatory medical care, identifies obstacles to overcome and incentives to encourage and makes recommendations for future development with the aim of optimizing the management of healthcare costs, with special emphasis on the role of information technology to master the complex system of information flows between the many stakeholders.  It does also identify the potential hurdles and necessary incentives and looks at issues of compliance with existing law and legal adaptation to the new requirements.  It also evokes the necessary training of the various actors in order for the system to function adequately. Working-group Leaders: Francis Lévi, Professor of Medical Oncology and NATF Fellow, and Christian Saguez, Former Professor at École Centrale de Paris and NATF Fellow.
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22 Oct Individualised Medicine Prerequisites and Consequences

National Academy of Science and Engineering (acatech)
2014
One of medicine’s central goals has been and is to heal, relieve or even prevent patients’ diseases. At the beginning of the 21st century, biomedical research and clinical medicine are undergoing a transformation, described by many as a paradigm shift. New approaches based on genome analyses and biomedical technologies are making it possible to analyse biological processes more precisely and more thoroughly than ever before. Associated with this is the goal of better understanding the causes of disease, providing accurate diagnoses, and last but not least, developing highly effective, precisely targeted therapies that have few side effects. For example, our understanding of why people who apparently have the same illness react differently to the same therapy is growing. ‘Individualised Medicine’ is an approach that adds another dimension to our understanding of illnesses. However, a number of ethical, legal and economic questions are associated with Individualised Medicine. This Statement depicts current developments, challenges and framework conditions of Individualised Medicine.
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